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There was a recent news item taken from an article in Pediatrics examining what happens when computerized language assistance services (LAS) are imperfect.  It focused on the erroneous translation of prescription information from English to Spanish in pharmacies in New York and possible consequences.  That was similar to an aspect of our LAS research we highlighted in an interview in The Oncology Pharmacist several months ago.  We are examining related problems as well, including low- and high-tech solutions to varying issues with LAS (e.g. automated LAS kiosks, natural language processing, pictographs).  In December 2009, we presented a poster of the results of a national survey of the use of language assistance services (sometimes called language access services) in community pharmacies.  One of the major concerns in using LAS cited by pharmacists (52.1%) in our study was about mistakes made with translations (written) and interpretations (verbal).  Their concerns appear to be at least somewhat justified based on the results of the Pediatric study.  This is a contributing factor as to why almost half (49.8%) of pharmacists in our survey who have LAS fail to notify their patients of its availability.

@kevinclauson

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