A couple of weeks ago I read a very thoughtful post on one of my favorite blogs (authored by @laikas).  One reason I enjoy Jacqueline’s blog is that it contains evaluation (or at minimum consideration) of the information and literature that its posts are written about…rather than simply repackaging it without any context.  I do believe there is also clear value for blog posts that primarily serve current awareness, etc.  However, when a blog is augmented with the occasional reflective or methodical examination, it is elevated to a different level IMHO.  It’s somewhat akin to the difference in nominations for the medGadget Awards versus the Research Blogging Awards (chapeau tip to @DrVal).  The information found in both award contenders is valuable, but serves different purposes.     

In any event, the post about randomized, controlled trials (RCTs) and evidence based medicine (EBM) on Laika’s MedLibLog made me reconsider a lecture I had just finished putting together on trial design for a Drug Literature Evaluation course.  In that course, there are several lectures on different types of trial design as well as separate ones about EBM and clinical practice guidelines (CPGs) –  but they are all probably a little too insular.  Each lecture may be a little too focused on the technical aspects, and guilty of ignoring how each fits into the grand scheme of things.

The Point Of All This

When I first prepared my lecture on trial design, I think I was too preoccupied with conveying the importance of fundamentals to the students.  Reading the aforementioned post made me re-think my approach a bit and prompted me to revise the lecture/slides to incorporate a little more integration and application.  To that end, I posted them on Slideshare.  For me, this sequence of events is a perfect example of the underlying concepts of Web 2.0 in action…and that’s pretty cool.

@kevinclauson

P.S. I used the Guided Notes approach (which is why it looks like there is a preponderance of underlined text) and an audience response system in this lecture.