Texting for Diabetes @ Medicine 2.0’11 Stanford

For Medicine 2.0 (#med2) at Stanford this month, I am excited to be delivering a Research in Progress presentation of our study,  “Impact of Texting and Predictive Potential of Health Literacy on Medication Adherence in Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus”. The study, supported by the McKesson Foundation Mobilizing for Health grant program, aims to help a diverse and largely uninsured and underinsured population in South Florida improve adherence to the medications they take for type 2 diabetes mellitus. Our study intervention is designed as a simple series of text messages through treatment targeting one of the primary hurdles to optimal medication adherence – reminders. I will also be sharing our plan for integrating health literacy assessments and disease state knowledge into the clinic EHR as a means to provide more patient-centric counseling and support. Our hope is that we produce an effective intervention to improve health which is also low-cost and thus ultimately scalable. There are a lot of scary numbers being bandied about for diabetes such as its $174 billion annual cost and forecasts that as many as 1 in 3 Americans could develop diabetes by 2050; it would be massive if this contribution could assist in stemming the tide.

Beyond being surrounded by a great study team, I have also been fortunate that providers at our primary care clinic partners have become very enthused about the study. We actually amended our original protocol to account for the fact that physicians at other clinics within the Memorial Healthcare System approached us and volunteered to help recruit participants.

Over the years, Mednet and its offspring, the Medicine 2.0 Congress have been among the most ambitious, surprising, and practically beneficial conferences I’ve attended.  Every year I see new attendees from seemingly disparate areas and sectors that come and then find commonalities that produce stimulating discussions, research collaborations, business ventures, and even friendships. This year will continue that tradition with the pre-conference lineup at the Stanford Summit on September 16, 2011 and the two-day Medicine 2.0 conference proper that follows on September 17th and 18th.  I will be there to share our research to date and eager to participate in the other sessions. I hope to see you there too!

@kevinclauson

Pimp My Poster

Like many colleges of pharmacy, ours added a seminar component years ago. The seminar has since been expanded to include a paper, a poster, and a podium presentation.  The topics range from literature-driven examinations of therapeutic controversies to original research tied to the faculty mentor’s specialty.  This year I was responsible for the recitation on the poster component.  This slide deck is what I used for that lecture.  Two particularly notable resources for me in assembling this lecture included the piece in The Scientist that inspired the name [1] and the site maintained by the Godfather of Scientific Posters: Dr. Colin Purrington [2].  If you want to dig a little deeper, here are my current favorite articles on the topic as well [3-5].  The full-text of all of these journal articles is currently available online for free.

I’ve benefitted from attending a lot of conferences over time and have seen (and continue to see) posters that are masterful creations, along with others that are absolute rubbish.  I posted the ‘Pimp My Poster’ slide deck here in hopes that it may be a resource to others, but am also keen for feedback to improve it for future iterations. 

@kevinclauson

[1]  Westly E. Pimp my poster. The Scientist 2008;22(10):22.
[2]  Purrington CB. Advice on designing scientific posters. 2009. http://www.swarthmore.edu/NatSci/cpurrin1/posteradvice.htm Accessed February 2, 2011.
[3]  Erren TC, Bourne PE. Ten simple rules for a good poster presentation. PLoS Comput Biol 2007;3(5):e102.
[4]  Hamilton CW. At a glance: a stepwise approach to successful poster presentations. Chest 2008;134(2):457-9.
[5]  Wood GJ, Morrison RS. Writing abstracts and developing posters for national meetings. J Palliat Med 2011 Jan 17 [Epub ahead of print].

If this level of creativity could only be used for ‘good’

The 10th annual ePharma Summit was held over the last few days in NY.  I was interested due to some of the scheduled speakers but could not make it, so I dipped in and out of the virtual conference stream as possible and found some pretty worthwhile content in there.  The most convenient way to follow was via #ePharma on Twitter, but the conference site also did a pretty good job of posting videos (although the audio was almost inaudible at times) and other information.

What ultimately prompted me to blog about it was a tweet (via @WendyBlackburn & @pjmachado) about a parody video produced by Kevin Nalty (@nalts) [see below].  It just struck me as creative, funny, and very strong work…and it made me think how great it would be if that kind of creativity could be unleashed to design social media/mobile/any type of health-related content aimed at informing, educating, and empowering patients.  Yes, the creativity behind this video is being used for ‘good’, but minus the shackles it could be used for a much greater ‘good’.  I think that social media, in particular, has a lot to offer on this front and it is unfortunate that the regulatory environment is such that this is largely not possible right now.  There have been some efforts along these lines and there was even a preliminary paper just published on the use of Facebook to deliver HIV education.  However, there remains a long way to go – and I’m not just talking about ‘official guidance’ in a single arena. 

More anon, for now…I hope you enjoy the video.

@kevinclauson

Note: If you click on the video it may say it is restricted on certain sites as it contains content from Universal Music Group and must be played on You Tube…so you can click ‘Watch on YouTube’ to play or go to the epharmify Channel to view it.

Medicine 2.0’11 at Stanford – Call for Abstracts

The Medicine 2.0 World Congress on Social Media and Web 2.0 in Health, Medicine, and Biomedical Sciences is one of the most valuable conferences I have ever attended.  It has been the meeting in this arena with the clearest focus on actual research and evidence for Medicine 2.0 issues and also offers the best opportunity to connect with other researchers, clinicians, e-patients, business and policy people.  In fact, the very first Medicine 2.0 Congress was where I was introduced to (and/or first met IRL) so many people who went on to become research collaborators, colleagues, and friends. 

In the spirit of that original meeting, I am excited for this year’s Medicine 2.0 at Stanford (September 16-18, 2011).  I have always appreciated the fact that Medicine 2.0 has truly been an international gathering, but am happy to see that it is coming to the United States for the first time.  I am also eager to see another first,  the one-day Stanford Summit at Medicine 2.0, which will directly precede the Medicine 2.0 Congress.  The Summit is lining up to have an incredible array of moderators and panelists.

Given the quality of the attendees and the opportunities for discussion/dissemination of your research (and networking), if you are working in this field I would strongly urge you to respond to the Call for Abstracts, Presentations, Interactive Demos, Startup Pitches and Panel Proposals for Medicine 2.0 at Stanford.  The deadline for submission is a (rapidly approaching) March 1st, 2011.  You can click on the link for the Call or start the process by watching the overview below by this year’s Conference organizer, Dr. Larry Chu.  Also, feel free to contact me with any questions and I look forward to seeing you there!

@kevinclauson

Medicine 2.0 Call for Abstracts from Larry Chu on Vimeo.

mHealth Summit 2010 ATF Part 1

I already miss the sound of the techno music from the Walter E. Washington Convention Center at the 2010 mHealth Summit.  Because I’ve seen a number of questions about what mHealth is, here is my preferred definition from lecture courtesy of @mHealthAlliance: “the use of mobile devices and global networks to deliver health services and information”.  One reason I like this definition is its emphasis on the ‘network’ piece.  It allows for a much broader application.  I understand the desire by some for the term uHealth (u=ubiquitous) and others, like one presenter at AMIA 2-3 years ago from Rockefeller, who yearn for everything to eventually just be ‘health’.  While recognizing that the types of labels like mHealth can definitely be problematic in the long-run, they also can be really useful in the short term for conveying a basic context, getting people to the table, and creating rallying points…which brings me to my next point.  One of the oft-parroted comments of the Summit was that there was too much hype about mHealth.  Unfortunately the word ‘hype’ was being used interchangeably with ‘excitement’ in many cases.  Of course mHealth isn’t a panacea and there are serious obstacles to navigate.  But let’s not lose sight of the fact that it is really hard to motivate people, to excite people, and to generate momentum…and mHealth is accomplishing those things.  So please let’s not be so terrified about overpromising and under-delivering that we squash genuine enthusiasm.  Of course there are speed bumps and as @joncamfield noted, there are definitely some mobile parlor tricks to be wary of out there (he also had the fantastic idea of an implementer track for next year).  In the interest of being fair and balanced, here is an example of a public health/mHealth app featuring augmented reality that may mean well but has questionable execution [EDIT: yes, the video below is for an actual app].

Onto the conference proper…David Aylward, Executive Director of the mHealth Alliance, began with a pseudo-demo of wearable body area networking for basic vitals.  Side note: Aylward closed the conference while wearing a Bugs Bunny tie that I speculated was an ode to Ted Turner and his Cartoon Network.  This remains unconfirmed.  Slightly more relevant, the conference was livestreamed and h/t to @planetrussell who noted that videos from the stream are starting to appear in various YouTube channels.

 

The first two WOW moments of #mhs10 for me included the announcement of the 2011 NIH Summer Institute on mHealth Research, which will provide specialized training opportunities for 25 researchers.

 

The second was during a panel presentation by @JoshNesbit in which he shared a word cloud of the tweets from Haiti following the earthquake.  The wow moment was when he pointed out that the second most tweeted word was ‘please’.  That revelation definitely gave me pause. 

End ATF: Part 1

@kevinclauson

 

Part 2 may or may not highlight snarky entrepreneurs, bedsore-preventing robots, keynote Star Wars quotes, and actual data.