Tag Archive | presentations

Medicine 2.0’11 at Stanford – Call for Abstracts

The Medicine 2.0 World Congress on Social Media and Web 2.0 in Health, Medicine, and Biomedical Sciences is one of the most valuable conferences I have ever attended.  It has been the meeting in this arena with the clearest focus on actual research and evidence for Medicine 2.0 issues and also offers the best opportunity to connect with other researchers, clinicians, e-patients, business and policy people.  In fact, the very first Medicine 2.0 Congress was where I was introduced to (and/or first met IRL) so many people who went on to become research collaborators, colleagues, and friends. 

In the spirit of that original meeting, I am excited for this year’s Medicine 2.0 at Stanford (September 16-18, 2011).  I have always appreciated the fact that Medicine 2.0 has truly been an international gathering, but am happy to see that it is coming to the United States for the first time.  I am also eager to see another first,  the one-day Stanford Summit at Medicine 2.0, which will directly precede the Medicine 2.0 Congress.  The Summit is lining up to have an incredible array of moderators and panelists.

Given the quality of the attendees and the opportunities for discussion/dissemination of your research (and networking), if you are working in this field I would strongly urge you to respond to the Call for Abstracts, Presentations, Interactive Demos, Startup Pitches and Panel Proposals for Medicine 2.0 at Stanford.  The deadline for submission is a (rapidly approaching) March 1st, 2011.  You can click on the link for the Call or start the process by watching the overview below by this year’s Conference organizer, Dr. Larry Chu.  Also, feel free to contact me with any questions and I look forward to seeing you there!

@kevinclauson

Medicine 2.0 Call for Abstracts from Larry Chu on Vimeo.

The Beauty of Data Visualization

If you’re not familiar with the website for TED (Technology, Education, and Design) Talks, you are missing out on a great resource that also happens to be free.  Suffice to say for now that the TED events are expensive ($6000), exclusive (fill out an application just to be eligible to pay the 6K), and according to attendees – well worth it.  Fortunately, the Powers That Be at TED decided back in 2007 that if they were really about “Ideas Worth Spreading” then they probably should unshackle them.  For anyone who has to teach or present, these talks represent a mini-master class in communicating in the one-to-many model.  For those looking to see content experts, there are plenty of those.  And for futurists, think-tank wannabes, and people sincerely looking to be inspired to create change – TED has those talks in spades as well.

I recently viewed a TED talk by data journalist David McCandless on The Beauty of Data Visualization.  I decided to watch the video because we’ve been dabbling with data visualization for displaying some of our research findings.  Employing data visualization techniques appears to be growing trend in informatics as one way to help process the unprecedented volume of data that can be accumulated in a relatively short time. 

It turns out McCandless also wrote the book The Visual Miscellaneum: A Colorful Guide to the World’s Most Consequential Trivia, which a student had given to me earlier this year (Köszönöm!).  The technique is akin to a visual version of performing a content analysis to find what themes emerge in qualitative research.   In that way it can also act as its own information filter, detect patterns that are not readily apparent, give context to potentially misleading ‘facts’, and prompt further lines of inquiry.  This book has a little more modern, pop-science feel than the more precise works by Tufte, but definitely prompted me to think about things a bit differently…and that is a pretty big value itself.

The TED video was quite good and had some clever bits such as the examination of military budgets by raw numbers versus as a percentage of GDP, followed by the number of soldiers by country and then per 100,000 people.  It’s a little specialized, but if you’re interested in the topic – it is a treat.

@kevinclauson

The Science Behind Engaging Students in Class


I have been experimenting with one of my previous lectures, How To Fight Lecturalgia, in terms of incorporating the feedback, questions, and discussions that have followed after presenting it at several universities.  This new presentation is titled, The Science Behind Engaging Students in Class.  My primary aim was to make the scientific or evidence-based approach I used more readily apparent.  I specifically wanted  to enhance its literature-driven  model to give some depth as to the ‘why’  of the recommendations to augment the ‘what’.  So this presentation represents the attempt to provide theoretical and research underpinnings for use of an audience response system as well as visual design and cognitive load elements used to engage students.

@kevinclauson

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