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ASHP Guide to Residency Prep

Get_the_Residency_COV-PNGCnvtSince the demand for pharmacy residency spots far outstrips the supply – only about 60% of students match nationally – my colleagues Josh Caballero, PharmD, BCPP and Sandra Benavides, PharmD created a course to better prepare students at our College of Pharmacy to pursue a residency. Over the next couple of years, students completing that course went on to match 80% of the time. That success eventually turned into the recently published bookGet The Residency:  ASHP’s Guide to Residency Interviews and Preparation edited by Drs. Caballero, Benavides, and I. The book was written in collaboration with faculty, clinicians, and residency program directors from across the country. I am pleased that it has been well received by students and reviewers alike and has entered its second printing. Currently, Dr. Caballero directs a neurocognitive fellowship and I serve as a director of a fellowship in consumer health informatics.

@kevinclauson

Helping Your Patients Make Sense of the mHealth Marketplace

One of my favorite developments within the Florida Society of Health-System Pharmacists (FSHP) has been membership’s growing interest in informatics. Of course, there are FSHP members who have been active in informatics for 20+ years, but the increased focus on it in the last 5 or so has been particularly encouraging.

To that end, I was asked to present this year at FSHP Annual on one of my favorite topics – patients’ use of mobile health (mHealth) apps to enhance their self-management. The expanded slide deck from my FSHP presentation is below. 

@kevinclauson

Consumer Health Informatics Elective: Expertsourcing

ExpertsourcingThe Consumer Health Informatics & Web 2.0 in Healthcare elective I coordinate for the college of pharmacy wrapped up in December and the ‘votes’ are in about the course. I felt the course went more smoothly this semester and was thrilled to again be able to expertsource several topics by benefiting from guest lecturers. However, the final decision (as always) rests with the students, whose opinions were solicited in the quest to improve the course.

The final exam is an all essay affair (which is not exactly universally popular) and at the end prompted the students to share their opinions on the most and least useful/interesting lectures of the semester along with other feedback.

Based on the comments they wrote, the topics that generated the most traction among students were mHealth and eProfessionalism. Students conveyed they were most intrigued about the potential of mHealth and felt like the issues within eProfessionalism were most personally relevant in their lives. Contributing guest lectures on these topics were leading social media & pharmacy thinker and University of Kentucky professor Jeff Cain (@DrJeffCain) and pediatric endocrinologist-turned-entrepreneur Jen Dyer (@EndoGoddess), who has created an eponymous app. Dr. Cain’s contribution, in particular, may end up having the most longevity of all topics within the course.

QpidMeDemoText

However, the most polarizing topic (and lively discussion) was spurred by the guest lecture “Spread the Love, Nothing Else” by Ramin Bastani (@RaminB) of Qpid.me. I first met Ramin at @BJFogg’s excellent Mobile Health @ Stanford. While I wasn’t entirely sure what I thought of the STD-notification idea initially, I certainly believed it would be a great tool to engage students about issues surrounding mHealth, the changing nature of communication via social media, and public health. It was. They were.

A sneak peek of data and a physician perspective on use of social media caught the attention of a group of our students as well. Stanford Medicine X creator and AIM Lab Director Larry Chu (@LarryChu) provided an interesting look via his analysis of 4999 online physician ratings.

The most pharmacy informatics-centric and global perspectives that resonated with students were provided by Jerry Fahrni (@JFahrni) of Talyst and Brent Fox (@Brent_Fox) of Auburn University, respectively. The course (unsurprisingly) is focused on the consumer health subspecialty of informatics, but those students who already are planning a path in pharmacy informatics clearly took to Dr. Fahrni’s lecture.

One of the new topics this semester was #SocialGood where we talked a bit about efforts like Free Rice and Kiva. It was really inspired by The Dragonfly Effect lecture from the 2011 Medicine 2.0 Congress. It was pretty primer-y and could likely benefit from a guest lecturer (suggestions?).

All-in-all, the course had some great moments, I think the students took away some useful tools and ideas, and I definitely learned an enormous amount from them and the guest lecturers!

@kevinclauson

Launching a Center for Consumer Health Informatics Research

We are very excited that the Nova Southeastern University College of Pharmacy has officially launched our Center for Consumer Health Informatics Research (CCHIR)! Like all undertakings of this magnitude, it has been in the works for some time and has benefited from tremendous support from many corners – in particular the Chair of the Department of Pharmacy Practice and the Dean of the College of Pharmacy. Below is a presentation outlining some basics about the Center. I look forward to working with its faculty and collaborators and steering the CCHIR toward many great developments in the future.

@kevinclauson

 

UPDATE: The dedicated site is up at www.CCHIR.com

Texting for Diabetes @ Medicine 2.0’11 Stanford

For Medicine 2.0 (#med2) at Stanford this month, I am excited to be delivering a Research in Progress presentation of our study,  “Impact of Texting and Predictive Potential of Health Literacy on Medication Adherence in Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus”. The study, supported by the McKesson Foundation Mobilizing for Health grant program, aims to help a diverse and largely uninsured and underinsured population in South Florida improve adherence to the medications they take for type 2 diabetes mellitus. Our study intervention is designed as a simple series of text messages through treatment targeting one of the primary hurdles to optimal medication adherence – reminders. I will also be sharing our plan for integrating health literacy assessments and disease state knowledge into the clinic EHR as a means to provide more patient-centric counseling and support. Our hope is that we produce an effective intervention to improve health which is also low-cost and thus ultimately scalable. There are a lot of scary numbers being bandied about for diabetes such as its $174 billion annual cost and forecasts that as many as 1 in 3 Americans could develop diabetes by 2050; it would be massive if this contribution could assist in stemming the tide.

Beyond being surrounded by a great study team, I have also been fortunate that providers at our primary care clinic partners have become very enthused about the study. We actually amended our original protocol to account for the fact that physicians at other clinics within the Memorial Healthcare System approached us and volunteered to help recruit participants.

Over the years, Mednet and its offspring, the Medicine 2.0 Congress have been among the most ambitious, surprising, and practically beneficial conferences I’ve attended.  Every year I see new attendees from seemingly disparate areas and sectors that come and then find commonalities that produce stimulating discussions, research collaborations, business ventures, and even friendships. This year will continue that tradition with the pre-conference lineup at the Stanford Summit on September 16, 2011 and the two-day Medicine 2.0 conference proper that follows on September 17th and 18th.  I will be there to share our research to date and eager to participate in the other sessions. I hope to see you there too!

@kevinclauson

Pharmacy: Is there an app for you

The 45th Annual Meeting of the Florida Society of Health-System Pharmacists (FSHP) was held in Orlando during the weekend. Since it is a state organization conference, it is much smaller than gatherings like the ASHP Midyear Clinical Meeting. This allowed for a streamlined set of programming tracks and a more relaxed atmosphere. There were also some interesting individual sessions (and necessities) on medication errors, pain management, etc.  I particularly liked the presentation on “Cyberhealth”, which focused on issues with Internet Pharmacy. Additionally, I had the opportunity to present “Pharmacy: Is there an app for you” at the meeting.

@kevinclauson

 

Mobile Health 2011: A Look Back at What Really Worked

Stanford Guest House

Mobile Health 2011: What Really Works at Stanford University (#mh11) is over, so it’s time for a quick look back at the conference.  To borrow (steal?) from conference organizer, Stanford Persuasion Technology Lab director, and quick-change artist @BJFogg – I am going to take a retrospective look at my experiences there through the device of ‘home runs’.  For full speaker slide decks, you can click here.

Conference Atmosphere Home Run
I have been to a lot of conferences…pharmacy conferences, medical conferences, informatics conferences, and social media conferences.  However, I have never been to a conference that seemed more along the lines of an ‘event that happens to be interspersed with speakers’.  This is not an indictment of the quantity or quality of the speakers; somehow there were >50 of them smoothly shoehorned into two days.  The comment is more about the carnival-like atmosphere surrounding the conference that made it fun and exciting, and contributed to a very collegial vibe.  One of the best aspects of Mobile Health was the extended breaks.  They were just plentiful enough and twice as long as an average conference.  If you think about the old chestnut ‘the best value at a conference is the hallway conversations’…voila! Those breaks doubled the value of the conference.  Also helpful was Fogg’s “giving permission” to all attendees to go up to anyone there and say hello, reinforced by the speakers largely making themselves available after panels concluded.  I’m still undecided about a few things (e.g., the birds and the bees); however, balancing all the West Coast wackiness was the fact that the conference was timed and chimed down to the minute.  Seriously.

Lodging Home Run
It’s almost like this place is a secret or something.  I stayed at the Stanford Guest House for their conference rate of $109.  You can barely stay at a Roof Rouge near a major city for that.  The rooms and hotel were basic and a little Spartan, but the beds were comfortable, the place was immaculately maintained, and the staff was gracious and knowledgeable.  The deal-maker was that the Stanford Shuttle (Marguerite) had pick-ups ~ every 20 minutes to take you all over the campus.  There was also a Guest House shuttle that could be reserved (e.g., to take you to the Alumni Center‘s conference venue).  The only drawback was that there were no dining options in-house or within easy walking distance.  Definitely will stay here again next time I’m at Stanford.

Almost Made Me Apply for a Job in Public Health Home Run
Sharon Bogan.  You just have to love somebody with that kind of spirit, fighting the good fight, excerpting Monsters, Inc., innovating in resource-limited settings, and inviting litigation (for others).  Everyone I’ve met from King County Public Health going back to the mhealth Summit has been a gem.

Goosebump Home Run [tie]
Green Goose and Proteus ingestible event markers.  Check them out.  Seriously.  They *literally* gave me goose bumps in thinking of potential applications of their technologies during their presentations.
Honorable mention: Google Cow presented by Google’s Chief Health Strategist (@rzeiger).  Technically he was focusing on Google Body, but since I had already seen Body I was pretty happy to see the bovine version.

Reunion Home Run
It was great to see @chiah @EndoGoddess @JenSMcCabe  KarenCoppock  @LarryChu  @SFCarrie  @SusannahFox and loads of others again!

New Peeps Home Run [misc]
If you are worried about our future, know that we are in good hands with people like @hcolelewis coming on the scene
Most likely to isosceles with regarding mHealth, PAHO, & Uruguay @JuanMZorrilla
Most likely to invite for Skype in guest lecture in my Consumer Health Informatics course @QpidMe
Most likely to explore the mHealth studies based out of our campus in Puerto Rico with @MarcosPolanco
Most surprised to find in my back yard Vic Shroff
Note: any conversations that included words like NDA, lawyer, or launch are not listed here for obvious reasons.

Failed to Connect at All Strikeout
I would have liked to have spoken with @enochchoi

Conversationus Interruptus Strikeout
The Keck and and PHI guys

Best Laid Plans Strikeout
Climate control and the janky A/C resulted in groups of attendees going to the outer hall and watching panels on a screen and/or going outside to cool off.
(Dis)honorable mention: minimal power outlets/juice available was surprising.  This problem was offset somewhat by the length of the breaks which allowed for both networking and recharging.

Least Favorite Panel
The Partnerships panel was my least favorite.  It definitely had eye-opening moments for some attendees and there were interesting discussions and placements (e.g., possibly the least and most idealistic two people at the entire conference were seated next to each other).  However, most of the discussions were pretty familiar to me from having gone through many of the processes described.  So my bias/preference would have been to have instead heard more specifics about MedPedia from James, Medic Mobile or Social from Josh, etc.

Overall Favorite Panel
Very tough decision as there were several really outstanding ones.  I considered a tie here but was able to pull the trigger and name “Methods and Measures for Research and Evaluation” as my favorite overall panel.  The moderator and panelists all had great content to share and illuminated a lot of the challenges in conducting research in this space.  Plus the Open mHealth initiative is so encouraging!  I think this panel is a ‘must view’ for everyone as it can help in introducing a common language that could lead to better coordination and scaling of efforts as well as providing guidance for individuals.  Overall, the quality and detail of this panel was exemplary.  I ended up choosing it in part based on the criteria of ‘if I could only have the full video of one panel’ because of its high utility for me and in sharing with multiple audiences.  Many of the slide decks from this panel are here.

Final Verdict
I am definitely happy I attended both the pre-conference workshop by @BjFogg (although it mostly served to whet my appetite for the full Boot Camp) as well as the conference proper.  I have been to some good conferences that were one-offs, but will absolutely figure out a way to make it back to Mobile Health next year.  My two most substantial takeaways were that the construct of this conference was singular in nature and that it was probably easier to connect with potential collaborators here than at any other conference I’ve attended.

@kevinclauson

Update: other perspectives on the conference have previously been posted here by @thulcandrian of AIDS.gov and a take on mHealth by @geoffclapp here.

Update 2. Here is a new conference highlights post by Craig Lefebvre (who I wish I had realized was @chiefmaven when I met him there)

Update 3: ‘Text in the City’ founder Katie Malbon has written the most ambitious mh#11 wrap-up to date

Update 4: If @TextInTheCityNY had the most ambitious/complete post, @geoffclapp has added the most thoughtful and thought-provoking review to date

Update 5: From the ‘people I wish I had a chat with’ file at #mh11, @AndrewPWilson has now provided his main takeaways from Stanford

Update 6: Patient-centric thought bubbles and more from e-Patients.net rep @msaxolotl at #mh11

Update 7: Jeff Kellem (@slantedhall) provided a tech-focused list of quick hits from the conference

Update 8: David Doherty (@3GDoctor) has added the most contrarian view of the conference to the conversation here

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